Cyril of Alexandria on Christ’s body and blood being truly present in the Supper, and the power of the Word of God. “He, being the Truth, cannot lie.” Amen!

It was fitting therefore for Him to be in us both divinely by the Holy Ghost, and also, so to speak, to be mingled with our bodies by His holy flesh and precious blood: which things also we possess as a life-giving eucharist, in the form of bread and wine. For lest we should be terrified by seeing (actual) flesh and blood placed upon the holy tables of our churches, God, humbling Himself to our infirmities, infuses into the things set before us the power of life, and transforms them into the efficacy of His flesh, that we may have them for a life-giving participation, and that the body of (Him Who is the) Life may be found in us as a life-producing seed. And do not doubt that this is true, since Himself plainly says, “This is My body: This is My blood:” but rather receive in faith the Saviour’s word; for He, being the Truth, cannot lie. And so wilt thou honour Him; for as the very wise John says, “He that receiveth His witness hath set his seal that God is true. For He Whom God sent speaketh the words of God.” For the words of God are of course true, and in no manner whatsoever can they be false: for even though we understand not in what way God worketh acts such as these, yet He Himself knoweth the way of His works. For when Nicodemus could not understand His words concerning holy baptism, and foolishly said, “How can these things be?” he heard Christ in answer say, “Verily I say unto you, that we speak that which we know, and testify that which we see, and ye receive not our testimony. If I have spoken unto you the earthly things, and ye believe not, how will ye believe if I tell you the heavenly things?” For how indeed can a man learn those things which transcend the powers of our mind and reason? Let therefore this our divine mystery be honoured by faith.

 Cyril of Alexandria, A Commentary upon the Gospel according to S. Luke, trans. R. Payne Smith (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1859), 668–669.